Friday, January 6, 2012

Fractal Entanglement



This entry I hope adds to the discussion on quantum entanglement.

Fractal Entanglement
The fractal at a state of fractal superposition, and in perfect isolation – with no interference from other fractals – may demonstrate the principle of (quantum) entanglement.  

The 'general' fractal that I have been using to describe our reality in this blog is defined as a pattern the same, but different, at all scales' and best demonstrated by the Koch Snowflake (below).

The Koch Snowflake fractal differs from reality in that it is not 'same but different' at all scales, but is rather an infinity of 'the same but same, at all scales'.
'Same same' as there is no interference from other fractals to change the shape of any of the triangles. As the triangles are – in principle – the same; they are – in principle –  'entangled', or coupled, or connected – at all (time*) scales; linked or 'parented' by the original (iteration 1) triangle. The possibilities of triangle location and position are spontaneous, instantaneous, and infinite; while the formation – the production speed – of the real fractal is limited to the fractal production speed – and this is possibly, the speed of light.
Any change to the parent triangle will instantly change all the infinite 'child' triangles  –  at the speed of production.  
In principle, if the parent triangle is changed –  a dot added to it, for example –  this dot change should be relayed to, and shared by, all the possible triangles, and only ever revealed on observation – at which point the infinite fractal shape is ended. The fractal collapses, and a reality formed.  The dot will be observed – elsewhere – on all triangles relating to that parent.

*In this entangled state – as discussed in another entry on time –  if there is no observation, there is no concept of time. 

1 comment:

  1. This is interesting and I do plan on following your rudimentary rough draft notes....thank you...any recommendations on literature I can read in regards to fractals?

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